Warner Bros Officially Locks Down ‘Suicide Squad’ Cast

Suicide Squad

It’s official folks. Warner Bros. have locked down an all star cast for the upcoming David Ayer directed DC super-villain blockbuster Suicide Squad. The locked down cast includes Oscar winner Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club) as the Joker, Will Smith, as Deadshot, Tom Hardy as Rick Flagg, Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn, Jai Courtney as Boomerang, and Cara Delevingne  as the Enchantress. Continue reading

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Paul Verhoeven’s World of Ultra Violent Science Fiction, …and Showgirls.

Paul Verhoeven on the set of Robocop
Paul Verhoeven on the set of Robocop

Just in time for the new reboot of the much coveted and adorned ultra-violent 80’s classic ‘Robocop’, what better time than now to have an all enveloping, all encompassing look at original director Paul Verhoeven’s career outside of his birthplace. His filmography has inadvertently cemented the director’s position somewhat – as a Sci-Fi auteur – a fan favourite; a name that is championed, due to his satirical take and political underpinnings within the genre. Subsequently, looking at Verhoeven’s North American tentpole produced films – Robocop, Total Recall, Basic Instinct, Showgirls, Starship Troopers and Hollow Man – it may come as a surprise, much to the demise of fans, that Verhoeven has been quite open about the fact that he has never been much of a Science Fiction fan, which is quite hard to believe considering. Continue reading

Constantine TV pilot gets Neil Marshal at the helm

John Constantine - Hellblazer: City of Demons
John Constantine – Hellblazer: City of Demons

Neil Marshal, who broke out into the horror scene with the surprise hit ‘Dog Soldiers’ and the creepily atmospheric ‘The Descent’, is set to bring some much needed irreverence to NBC’s pilot Constantine, having been given directorial duties on the DC project. Marshal dropped off the radar for a while after two of his feature length movies – Doomsday and Centurion – were subjected to abysmal distribution which inevitably lead to commercial failure and has recently been back on the small screen, taking on directing duties for both Games of Thrones and Black Sails, in which he directed two episodes for each of the high profile shows. Continue reading

Superman’s Henry Cavill vs Deaf Man: Table Ettiquette In Detroit Bar

Superman doesn't take too kindly to bad table manners
Superman doesn’t take too kindly to bad table manners

Henry Cavill does not seem to have the same interchangeable super senses as his on screen persona, as was riotously displayed earlier this year when Superman (quite literally and plot-tingly [in a figurative sense of course]) – came crashing into our screens – leaving no survivors in the collateral damage, due to the neck-braking pace that was a consistently overarching theme in Zack Snyders’ unabashedly colossal uber-smash-hit. Continue reading

Lone Survivor Review

lone-survivor-poster

Marcus Luttrell, a Navy Seal, and his team set out on a mission to capture or kill notorious al Qaeda leader Ahmad Shahd, in late June 2005. After running into mountain herders and capturing them, they were left with no choice but to follow their rules of engagement or be imprisoned. Now Marcus and his team are left to fight for their lives in one of the most valiant efforts of modern warfare. Continue reading

Review for Vin Diesel’s ‘Riddick’ (Blu-ray)

‘Riddick’ Uncut is released on Blu-ray and DVD today, but is it worth your buck? I weigh the pros and cons of this potentially fiscal dilemma.

Blu-ray cover

Betrayed by his own kind and left for dead on a desolate planet, Riddick fights for survival against alien predators and becomes more powerful and dangerous than ever before. Soon bounty hunters from throughout the galaxy descend on Riddick only to find themselves pawns in his greater scheme for revenge.

Continue reading

Review of ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street’

Leonardo Dicaprio in The Wolf Of Wall StreetThe Wolf of Wall Street seems to be pulling at the pupeteering strings of all those morally sanctimonious individuals’ – forming a congealed and sticky mass, due to a coma inducing, amorphous, undelineated and homogenous group of ‘journalistic film critics, quasi-popularish movie bloggers and tag-along-z-list-quaver-pundits who forever dwell in the subterranean stratus’s’ of dreadful hum dinging commercial televised-end-of-the-year-countdown shows with their overly practiced; overtly and irritatingly imprudent sound bites. Yet, one cannot help assuming that these are no doubt some of the same people who have decried annually at the unfathomable way in which Scorsese has been contemptuously and consistently robbed of the gloriously coveted award – the gold statuette: known as the Oscar. Lets be honest, the debates are merely being conjured for debating’s sake, creating a major surge of overspilled gumph and clogging up the over saturated movie blogosphere, with nauseating shock factor reviews as opposed to integrity driven reviews. Thus, even if some reviews generate controversy due to subjective but well-meaning reviewers (the late Roger Ebert springs to mind), they do so with good intentions, as opposed to the quirks of gaining some extra traffic flow. A self-fulfilling prophecy if you like; as in, the more some of the controversial issues get covered in the media, the more others compete to give a worsening opinion for the battle of the more detestable.

Thus, by mere proxy, these battles unfortunately become embedded within the lay persons general chit chat that generates naïvely negative ‘word-of-mouth’. Luckily, with it’s second weekend drop of an impressive 28% at the North American box office, it seems some films are impervious to the cheap tactics of following the leader with intent to trip them up and do one better (or worse). Without typecasting, I have come across certain grating issues that contradict, not only Scorsese’s style of film-making, but also the topical, thematic and overarching ethos and style that is expertly and professionally exuded from the auteur, which begs the question – what were these individuals’ expecting?!

So, just to point out to many a’ culprit; it’s a Scorsese film, with Scorsese sensibilities – touching on a taboo subject and adding a darkly comedic spin on shallow vacantly void individuals’.  The film does not condone the behaviour of the characters’ (Belfont) and their derogatory outlooks as some critics have implied. Just like Goodfellas was not condoning Mafioso’s; Casino was not condoning the seedy underworld of gambling; Taxi Driver was not condoning the extremely deprived nature of a sociopathic loner. There are all the pervading traits of emotionally indispensable and inherently non-gratuitous voyeurism and profanity that offer the realism of the ludicrous state of play during the 80s market boom, which highlights some of the ridiculously profound situations that the characters find themselves in. The casual film goer is not going to see ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ merely to count how many f-bombs were dropped as so many reputable sources have been bellowing and ranting about, and thus, overshadowing the most important and fundamental aspect as to whether the film delivers the goods. There is nothing gratuitous in the sense that what is displayed shot-by-shot is done in such a meticulous manner as to offer naturalist and voyeuristic manifestations’ necessary to muster up a verisimilitude to facilitate the viewers comprehension toward the almost unimaginable aspects, expositions and character motives whilst being suspended in a disbelief that is not only entertaining, but also darkly facetious.

The Wolf of Wall Street has all the ingredients, which help create a riveting, amoralistic and emboldeningly absurdist film about the portrayal of the sex-and-drugs-fueled-shenanigans’ during the 1980s stock market boom. It is everything that the many flawed Bret Easton Ellis adaptations wanted and tried so hard to to be. There is no doubt that DiCaprio is the star of the film, creating such a versatile performance about a man who was considered a super hero dirtbag; potraying his roller coaster ride in a crazy and true story of debauchery that would even have Belladonna blushing. Everyone is pulling above his or her weight in this one including what is left of Jonah Hills’. He has the chops as he has already proved acting alongside Brad Pitt in ‘Moneyball’, and due to the darkly comedic nature of the film, it is a role that fits Hills’ niche perfectly.

The films over the top content sucks you in because you feel you are part of the party for the duration of the film. This film is testament that an above average book can be converted into a great screenplay with a delightful ensemble cast, and  have all these elements molded into a tangibly visual feast. Be prepared to laugh, cringe and maybe even possibly relate to Scorsese’s best since Goodfellas.

5*****